Posts tagged google

How to Conquer On-Page SEO

Regardless of all the changes that have happened, it’s still possible to separate our SEO into largely ‘ON-PAGE SEO’ and OFF-PAGE SEO’. On-page, of course, refers to all the strategies that you can use within your pages to get Google interested in your site. This begins with content – and it begins with having a stronger understanding of the subtle changes Google has gone through in recent times.

How to Make Excellent Content

One of the first things you’re going to need to do is to fill your site with great content and to use your keywords throughout. There’s a fine line to be walked here: you need to repeat the phrase a few times to ensure that you create that association but at the same time, you also need to make sure that you don’t overdo it and thereby appear to be spamming.

Too vague? As mentioned, it’s now agreed that the optimum ‘keyword density’ for on-site content is 1-2%. That means you can use your phrase once per every 100-200 words. But you also need to use your common sense a little: some keywords are easier to use in a natural manner than others and making sure that your content sounds natural should always be the number one concern. Some keywords will be hard not to repeat 100 times! Others will never feel that they can come up naturally.

The user always comes first. So, if you can’t fit the keyword in naturally anywhere, just forget it and use it in your image alt-text etc. The length of your posts is also an important consideration. Back in the days of spammy-SEO, almost every post was 500 words long. Today, you’ll have the most success by writing posts that are longer and more in-depth. Imagine that your reader is going to sit down with a cup of tea and really dive deep into the subject – that’s the kind of experience that you should be delivering!

This has another advantage because it means that you can repeat your keyphrase a lot more while keeping your density low. If you repeat your keyword 100 times and your content is 1,000 words long then that’s a 10% density. If your content is 5,000 words long, that’s 2% density! Of course, 5,000 words is too long for most blog posts. Instead, the general consensus is that an ideal blog post will be somewhere in the region of 800-1,500 words.

But again:

remember that you serve your visitors first and foremost. These are the people that you want to impress and that means that you shouldn’t worry too much about length – do what comes naturally to your subject matter.
Oh, and while you’re at it – try to vary the lengths of your posts a little. This again looks more natural and suggests to Google that you’re not following a strict ‘formula’ of any kind!

Introducing a Conversational Google

At the same time, you also need to consider something called ‘LSI’ or ‘Latent Semantic Indexing’. This is basically a fancy term that explains how Google now understands actual meaning rather than just looking to match words. The way it does this is at least partly by looking for synonyms and related terms when trying to answer questions. In short, don’t just use the exact keyphrase but be sure to use lots of relevant and related language.

This is important partly because it can prevent a mismatch between searches. If someone searches for a homonym, like ‘duck’, how does Google know whether they mean the animal or the movement? Simple: by looking for related terms like ‘duckling’ and ‘feather’ or perhaps ‘dodge’ and ‘dive’.
At the same time, the use of synonyms and related language again shows Google that there is lots of content revolving around the same topic – it’s not just a case of having mentioned the search term a few times in an otherwise irrelevant piece of writing.

So if you’re writing about bicep workouts, then you need to make sure to include lots of related languages, like:

    • Arms Triceps
    • Dumbbells Training
    • Weightlifting

Doing this will confirm the subject matter of your site and will look a lot more natural and useful than if you just use the phrase. And for the same reason, it can also be a good idea to use variations on your keyphrase and to have
‘secondary’ search terms.

For example, if your keyphrase is ‘build massive arms’, then you should also try to include the terms ‘build big arms’, ‘build big biceps’, ‘get big biceps’ etc. Google now knows that this means the same thing but won’t be as likely to penalize you for keyword stuffing. It also makes you look like a better writer for your visitors! Essentially, try to keep in mind that Google no longer works by trying to match the search terms exactly in your content.

You can see this yourself when you search Google. Search ‘get big arms’ and many of the results that come up won’t actually include those precise words! Likewise, linking out to relevant resources might help Google to better understand the topic of your pages and posts, while also demonstrating that you are trying to provide extra value to your visitors.

SEMrush

Schemas and Structured Data

And on that same note, you should also look at rich snippets. Using ‘structured data’ you can highlight to Google certain key elements of your content: like recipes, dates, company names, scores etc. This helps Google show some of that information in the SERPs (search engine results pages) and thereby attracts more visitors to your site. There are plugins that will let you do this easily, or you can do it through meta tags.

Either way, you’ll use this to do things like highlighting the ingredients in a recipe, or the showtimes of play, or the score in a review. This is important because it lets Google understand your content even better than it is already able to. Google is no longer just a search engine but rather an Artificial Intelligence (AI) – this is the direction that Google is heading in and being able to understand and utilize this might just be the key to SEO success in future.

Right now, using structured data and rich snippets will allow information from your site to appear right in the SERPs. This way, if someone searches for a recipe, they’ll be able to see the ingredients for your version before they even click on your link! This means your listing will take up more space and demonstrates the value of your site. And all that, in turn, means that you’re going to attract more clicks than a site without that information.

Design and Layout

The next element of on-page optimization is the site design itself. Using breadcrumbs, for instance, can help a lot, as can using alt-tags for your images so that Google knows what they are of. More important is the actual function of your website: does the page load quickly? Is it mobile friendly? Mobile-friendliness, in particular, is something you absolutely cannot ignore in 2019 and beyond.

In terms of the actual design and function of your website, the main goals are to ensure your site will load quickly and that it will look great on mobile. Again, this helps to keep people on your site longer because it will be enjoyable for them to be there. Avoid using too many plugins which will slow you down and try not to inundate your visitors with adverts and pop-overs.

Did you know that using light colours, like light blues, can actually help to keep people on the page longer by making them feel more relaxed? Consider this when picking your theme. Likewise, choose a theme that will adapt to the size of the display viewing it and make sure that you take advantage of things like caching to keep your site nippy.

Themes that do this are called ‘responsive’, in that they respond to the shape and size of the display they’re being viewed on. This works by removing certain elements, by rearranging menus etc. and by shrinking images. Note that mobile-friendliness also means things like having large buttons (which are easier to click with a finger rather than a mouse) and also avoiding ‘mouse-over’ drop-down menus that again can’t be operated on mobile without a mouse.

The best way to ensure that your website is responsive, that it looks the part and that it will encourage the maximum engagement, is to use WordPress. WordPress is a CMS (Content Management System) that makes it incredibly easy to build a responsive website and then add a custom theme that you have downloaded (free or paid) or made yourself. Using WordPress removes much of the guesswork and makes it very easy for you to implement new layouts and even to add things like rich snippets by downloading the right plugins.

There’s a massive online community to support your development and the tool is used by many of the biggest sites on the net – meaning that it is a ‘proven quantity’ as far as SEO goes. Seeing as WordPress is free, you’re really just making life harder for yourself by using anything other than it to build your website.

More On-Page Optimization

As mentioned, there are a few miscellaneous tips that can also help you to improve your on-page SEO. For example, it’s generally accepted that using copyright notices and legal disclaimers can be seen as a positive sign by Google as these will make your website look more professional and more like a ‘real business’. Think as well about how you’re going to help Google find the content within your site.

Having a site map can be very helpful for indexing for example. And you need to avoid using images that have text in them and definitely avoid the use of Adobe Flash, seeing as Google is unable to read that type of copy. You can also insert your search terms in your site’s code – by including it in file names (the file name of an image for example) and including it in the permalinks (the URLs of specific pages – which should match the title of your posts).

Then you have the behaviour of your visitors. In other words: how long are your visitors staying on your page? Do they click lots of internal links? Do they scroll down the page? Are they leaving comments? Google wants to see that your site is offering value to your visitors and the best way they can do that is by looking to see if people are actually enjoying the content you’ve created. Your site design is all about getting your visitors to spend long on your page then and to interact with it.

You can do this by using  ‘related posts’ and by making your comments section appear more interesting and easier to use. But you also do it by simply ensuring that your site looks great, performs well and is filled with interesting and relevant content. Try to avoid adverts or bad design elements that are going to instantly put people off and cause them to leave your website!

Remember: Google wants to see that people are spending time on your website and the best way you can ensure this happens is by making content that people want to read. Moreover, you need to ensure that that content is presented in a way that encourages people to stick around. Forget dense blocks of text with no images.

Instead, create content with lots of headers, that’s well spaced out and that uses large beautiful pictures throughout. In terms of the actual writing, try to use a narrative structure where possible to really pull people in. Tell a story, use cliff hangers and make it impossible for your visitors not to move down to the next line!

Ultimately, it comes down to making sure that you’re providing the very best experience for your visitors – but doing so in such a way that Google can see and understand that that is the case.

SEMrush

A/B Testing with Google Analytics

A/B testing consists of having two versions of whatever you’re testing like two landing pages that are very slightly different. You then divide the traffic between the two versions and see which one converts at a higher rate. It seems simple enough but most marketers don’t even do it, even though it has shown time and again that website owner who conduct proper A/B testing experience higher conversions and a higher return on investment than those who don’t. You can do this testing with Google Analytics.

Create the Marketing Collateral

Whether it’s a sales page, newsletter landing page or something else entirely, create the designs in twos. You want to create two landing pages (A and B) that are slightly different. For example, perhaps each page has a different image on it, or a different headline, or perhaps a different buy/call to action button.

Upload the Pages to Your Site

You’ll need the URLs of the pages that you want to test. Make sure when you collect the URLs that you name each test page so that you know which one each URL is assigned to. Keep track of it all to ensure that you don’t get mixed up so that your results will turn out accurately.

Set Your Goals

Obviously, your goal is to make more money and increase your return on investment. But, you will have many different conversion goals, such as newsletter sign-ups, freebie downloads, sales and more. Choose an “experimental objective” within Google Analytics to create your goals. You can find this under Behavior and Experiments. Just click “Create Experience” to get started.

Name Your Experiment

Choose names for your experiments so that you can identify which page is working best during the testing. Once you’ve done this you can set your goals under “objectives for this experiment”. You have several choices such as AdSense, eCommerce, and many other goal metrics. Choose the best one for your test.

Run the Test

Once you have it all set up and uploaded, you can let it run. Keep checking up on your statistics as often as you can; at first, you may want to do it daily, then maybe weekly. Let it run long enough that you’re positive on which test, A or B, worked better.

Pick the Best Conversion Page

Remember that conversions and clicks are nice but money is the point. There are always possibilities that the most clicked and trafficked page is not the one that makes the most money. Therefore, it’s imperative to run the experiment long enough with enough variables to notice. For example, don’t sign people up for the same list even if the series is the same; that way you know which list is filled with either A or B respondents.

When you know what your goals are, and test to find out how accurate you have been designing sales pages and landing pages for your audience, you’ll soon get better at converting and making more money. Testing with Google Analytics is free and well worth it.

The 3 Spheres of Search Engine Ranking Optimization

If you wish to run the best SEO campaign possible, you ought to be focused on a couple of chief factors. One may show up well by emphasizing only one or two of the following considerations, but in the long term the success will be much better and stay longer if all of the three categories are boosted altogether.

Each time you perform a search on the Google site (or Bing, Yahoo Search or any of the numerous other online search engines), you’re not virtually “searching the web” at the time. You actually are performing a request for Google’s servers to look throughout its index, which is a database holding a portion from all of the web pages or other information readily available on the World Wide Web. The 3 elements of an efficient SEO campaign will guarantee that:

  1. Your internet site is incorporated into Google’s database
  2. Your content page is considered appropriate using the search being completed
  3. Your site is thought of as reputable and authoritative by an adequate number of additional online resources

Providing that you are aware of your markets and which search terms you aspire to get ranked for, the three aspects to work on to get the most improvement could be defined as follows:

  1. Technical Search Engine Optimization – This area is concerned with the techie facets of your website; all of the areas that will either enable or retard your site from being crawled and indexed. Many of these elements are like a pass/fail course; if they are not set up suitably, they are more than likely keeping your website from attaining its maximum potential in the search engines’ results.
  2. Relevance – This area is impacted by the indexed articles and other content of your website and precisely how that information is presented and structured. In order to rank for a distinct search term, it is extremely important to utilize the exact word or phrase in the important areas of the page you prefer to rank best. For popular key phrases, arranging the information in the right manner can allow the various search engines to discern just how much beneficial content the website has pertaining to the area of interest.
  3. Links from Many Other Internet Sites – Google establishes trust in a website by checking the backlinks connecting to it from other sites. Whenever a specific website links to another, it is akin to voting for the written content contained on that page. Each hyperlink is a pointer showing precisely where the person can find more information and facts regarding a topic.

Instead of just artificially developing links, establishing relationships will provide a legitimate motivation for other people to connect to you.

– Provide awesome service to your current clientele so they write about you, recommend you on Facebook.com and help to pass on your reputable name with word-of-mouth advertising.

– Get closer to your vendors – and even more importantly producers – so they offer you a “where to buy” link to your website

– Supply good content, which can include comments or prospective buyers guides, to aid prospective clients make a shrewd purchasing decision (and encourage lots of others to hyperlink to your site’s written content simultaneously).

– Link to some other websites that provide products or professional services complementary to your very own in return for a recommendation of your own offerings.

If you neglect a technical ingredient that is hindering your website from staying fully crawled and indexed, your pages may not rank well no matter how pertinent the content is or how many links you have referring to your website.